Download the Free Guide, Nine Things You Must Know to Succeed on a CareOne Debt Settlement Plan

A Straight Talk on Debt

A Straight Talk on Debt gives you the real deal on debt, straight from our employees and personal finance experts. Learn more about debt relief plans and how to be financially fit.

Download the Free Guide, Nine Things You Must Know to Succeed on a CareOne Debt Settlement Plan

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Download the Free Guide, Nine Things You Must Know to Succeed on a CareOne Debt Settlement PlanThe items outlined in this guide are what we consider to be the nine most important tips for success on our Debt Settlement Plan (DSP).

Providers of CareOne Debt Relief Services® work hard to support and assist those working toward financial independence.

This guide provides the insight and knowledge to take an active role in your own success, with items such as:

  • When-and how-to contact us
  • How to handle aggressive collection activities
  • What to do with extra earnings or bonuses received while enrolled on the plan
  • How to take advantage of the free tools and resources we offer

Just complete the form below to download the guide Nine Things You Must Know to Succeed on a Debt Settlement Plan as an easy-to-read PDF right to your computer.

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  • I am extremely sorry if someone truly has tragic circumstances that destroy them financially.  But my guess is that is maybe 1% of all people in debt.  The experiences with my own friends and family members can be summed up in 1 word - reckless!  They live significantly beyond their means and have just accepted that credit card debt is a way of life, pay the minimums and keep buying what you "want" !

    And worse, little to no motivation to work a full 40 hour week, show up on time, be diligent, committed and willing to do what it takes to bring income to household.  I see people who are the eternal victims, when they had a few extra bucks, a windfall, it was immediately squandered - never goes to actually pay down debt.  Oh no, we have to have that new piece of jewelry or furniture, that new gadget, that cruise or vacation, we DESERVE it!

    i have had to substantially change how i spend money in recent years due to the crash.  I am 62 and do have a wonderful job which i worked extremely hard to achieve over a 30 yr career ( without a college education!) , but it is tough,  stressful and demanding and I would LOVE to retire. I feel like I did everything right and now have been punished by OTHERS reckless decisions, houses they could never have afforded,  staggering credit card debt etc. Oh well!  Too bad for me,  no pity party here, just keep working!

    I am NOT sympathetic to 99% of people utterly sinking in debt.  They made irresponsible choices, don't like the 'grind' are lazy and entitled.  The other 1% who fell on hard times in spite of their best efforts - my heart goes out to them!

  • Doug, you have been marked. From this day forward life as you know it will fade away. People will see you for what you are, a mere troll.

  • I agree with you Ruth, I was brought to this website looking for a good article to read,and maybe some sound advice (not sign up to be a customer).

    And Thank You Karl Haye for your words of wisdom.......

  • Doug is a grade-A jerk and has not an ounce of compassion. May God help him when he is in need because no one else will.

  • Doug and others I don't want or need a pity party but, I do disagree with you that it's easy to stay out of debt. This may be a little longer that the usual posts. Please bear with me. My husband is a physcian and surgeon. I worked full time as an RN. We did not leave beyond our means, in fact were living below.Most of my income went into savings or low threat level, slow growth investments.. We had a solid middle class income. Not all doctors are filthy rich,, in spire of what is believed. At Christmas of 2005 my husband became very ill with heart failure, kidney fairlure and liver failure. He had a pacemaker ICD implanted and was able to work off and on. IIn 2009 I came to Florida on business and had a massiive heart attack, triple-bypass,2 valves replaced and a serious stroke. After 7 wks in the hospital I was discharged and was almost completlely helpless. A day or so later, I got a phone call that my husband had been air-lifted to U of M and needed a heart transplant.  I flew home, went right to the hospital and spent my 'recovery' ciriving 120 mi a day for 2 1/2 mo. Around the same time, our beautiful daughter was murdered and I took her  boys 15 and 12 driving them back and forth to school an 80 mi trip. Gas was $4.20 a gallon and no income so had to charge gas. Car insurance, house etc had to be charged. With the ecenomy our 'safe' slow growth investements tanked along with most everyone else. Now we are flat broke and liviing on social security, trying to pay our bills as best we can. So where did we screw up in your opinion? I saw the post about smoking, drinking and causing your own problems. We did none of these things, ate healthy and exercised. What could we have done differently? Oh by the way we didn't take lavish trips and most of my clothes came from JCPenny and Wal-Mart. Enlighten me with what I should have done.

  • I have a question for Me - which company did you work for that was on the 100 TOP list.  Thank you.

  • It is easy to stand and get out of debt, STOP LIVING BEYOND YOUR MEANS!

  • Folks!  I am single and buy only what I need.  Fortunately I don't watch TV and therefore am not inundated with thousands of adverts telling me what I MUST have.  I DON'T buy items new to the market be they new inventions or new models.  I wait a while and the price always drops and very often the later models have the previous models' glitches worked out.

  • What we finally figured out is that we always need to have savings on hand.  It's absolutly vital.  All of the debt we had came from emergencies.  They just kept happening, and we kept solving them with money that wasn't ours.  It adds up so fast.  Now we feel naked if we don't have a few thousand in the bank.  We aren't as tempted to spend savings when we think about what can happen and how far it can set us back.  Savings is a really good thing to hang on to.

  • Debt Settlement is the fastest and least expensive way to get out of debt without filing bankruptcy. During a debt settlement program professional debt negotiators work with your creditors to reduce your debt to a fraction of what you owe. Your debts are settled in an orderly manner as agreements are reached with each of your creditors. The program typically takes 12-36 months and is considered complete when all debts included in the program have been settled. Debt settlement, will negatively affect your credit score, but so will most all of the other available options. What’s more important to you, worrying about your credit score or getting out of debt and getting your life back on track?

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