Respect Your Money; be a Garbage Disposal

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Respect Your Money; be a Garbage Disposal

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Respect Your Money; be a Garbage Disposal
Most families have a garbage disposal. I'm not talking about that appliance that is installed below your kitchen sink that turns on with a flip of a switch used to grind up food waste before being flushed down the drain with a stream of water.

I'm talking about a human garbage disposal.

I'm talking about the person in the family that eats all the leftovers and uses all the products that everyone else has grown tired of, or has thrown in the trash convinced the container is empty.

In my home, I am that lucky individual.

When everyone else is taking a banana from the just purchased bunch, I'm the one taking the slightly overripe one from last week. If the salad is looking a little wilted, I pick out the leaves with brown on the edges. My salad will be just fine.

My bathroom drawer always contains at least one almost empty tube of toothpaste that had been discarded by another member of the family. Although it's barely recognizable in it's folded up, accordion likes shape which allows me to squeeze every last micro-ounce out of the tube.

The seat in my shower is crowded with upside down bottles of products I found in the trash of the other bathrooms in the home. Shampoo for colored hair, shampoo to reduce frizz (slightly ironic, don't you think?), and body washes of every fragrance imaginable.

Hawaiian plumeria bouquet? Hand it over, my deodorant will mask most of the feminine scent anyway.

While everything does add up, there probably isn't a significant savings in any of these practices. The point is, I cannot stand to waste things. We racked up a mountain of credit card debt by being wasteful.  Maybe I feel like eating an overripe, mushy banana or smelling like a bouquet of prairie flowers is my penance for abusing my finances for so many years. Or maybe this journey out of debt has changed my perspective.

Maybe I have finally learned to respect the value my hard earned money, and the products it allows me to buy. 

I don't see it as being frugal or cheap; I just see it as using everything I paid for.

Related Links:

Me vs. Coupons: Round 1

Would You Lie to Your Wife to Save $1.29?

Frugal Versus Cheap

Travis Pizel, Debt Management Plan Customer with Leading Provider of Debt Relief, CareOne Services, Inc. Travis Pizel

Travis is a contributing writer for the My Journey out of Debt and A Straight Talk on Debt blogs. He is also a very active member of the CareOne community forums. Travis is currently enrolled in a CareOne Debt Management Plan (DMP). Travis candidly shares his personal journey to pay off his debt and the tips he's learned along the way. As a father and husband he provides a unique perspective on balancing debt, finances, and family in Minnesota. You can also read more from Travis on the Enemy of Debt blog, where he is a featured blogger. Compensated Blogger for CareOne Debt Relief Services.

Follow Travis on Twitter @DebtChronicles

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  • Love it, Kelly.....maybe you should rename them "Mystery Meals?"  :)

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